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Posts tagged ‘Seán Mulryan’

Developers score €200,000 salaries from NAMA

Developers score €200,000 salaries from NAMA

 Some of the country’s most indebted developers – some of whom now owe the state billions after their debts were taken on by the National Asset Management Agency – have agreed new deals with NAMA which will see the agency invest in their new dealings – and pay them wages of up to €200,000 a year.

The deals, reported in today’s Sunday Times, mean that the developers – who owe between €1bn and €3bn – have been told they can pay themselves the bumper salaries as part of an arrangement which will see the agency split the profits on the sale or trading-out of some assets, once the developers’ performances exceed certain targets.

The creditors are also to be allowed to keep their homes if the targets are met – but if such targets are not met, NAMA reserves the right to repossess their family homes and sell them off.

The developers involved have also been told to cash in their pensions plans, which contain millions stockpiled in retirement funds, to be used as working capital for their businesses.

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Developers involved include Treasury Holdings owners Johnny Ronan and Richard Barrett, Liam Carroll, Seán Mulryan of Ballymore, Bernard McNamara and Joe O’Reilly.

A NAMA spokesman told the Sunday Times that the business plans submitted by the developers which required agency approval had run into thousands of pages in some cases, and that all had substantially reduced their office overhead expenses.

While the spokesman would not speculate on the individual salaries being paid to developers, he said they had seen their wages drop by between 50% and 75%.

Central Bank report for Quarter 2

Just more lies?
Central Bank report for Quarter 2, NAMA’s resident and non-resident borrowers
namawinelake :
source http://namawinelake.wordpress.com/2010/07/31/central-bank-report-for-quarter-2-nama%e2%80%99s-resident-and-non-resident-borrowers/

The wide-ranging quarterly Central Bank report and forecast published yesterday contains some interesting nuggets on NAMA and Irish property in general. On NAMA, it publishes information on the first tranche which hasn’t been publicly seen before, namely a split of the first tranche loans between resident and non-resident borrowers and also gives the provision the banks held for the loans transferred. The information is on page 39 of the report and is summarised here.

Of note is that the writedown by NAMA on the loans (49.6% in total) comprises a writedown by the banks themselves (23.7%) and NAMA’s additional write-down (26.9%) – given that Anglo’s accounts were published on 31st March, 2010 and INBS’s accounts were published on 9th April, 2010 and they each contained the government’s recapitalisations announced on 30th March, 2010, it is indeed amazing that they were showing their provisions at such a low level – was it a case that the accounts were produced many months earlier and only amended for the government’s injections of capital – wasn’t there any attempt to show the imminent NAMA haircuts? As to the split between resident and non-resident, I’m not sure how much can be deduced. For information the following were reported by the media (not confirmed by NAMA and indeed Paddy McKillen’s spokeswoman has denied that Paddy was in tranche 1) as being the Top 10 developers in the first tranche – spot the non-residents!
Liam Carroll
Bernard McNamara
Sean Mulryan
Derek Quinlan
Paddy McKillen
Treasury Holdings
Michael O’Flynn
Joe O’Reilly
Gerry Gannon
Gerry Barrett
As to what the Central Bank say in their report on page 39 about the write-downs with respect to residents and non-residents they are talking rubbish – the figures show that the resident loans had greater write-downs at both the banks and at NAMA.

Banks await loan acquisition schedules

Nama has missed three deadlines as lenders and the agency struggle with complex valuations, according to

by SIMON CARSWELL 

source http://www.irishtimes.com/newspaper/finance/2010/0227/1224265277431.html

NOW THAT the valuationshas signed off on the National Asset Management Agency (Nama), the delayed task of transferring the top 10 developers and loans of €17 billion can proceed.

The green light from Brussels allows Nama to start buying loans with a face value of about €80 billion from five guaranteed lenders for an estimated €54 billion, though both figures could change.

Preparatory work has so far proceeded slowly with the amount of paperwork connected to the top borrowers creating a bottleneck of information within Nama that its small staff and army of outside contractors are busy trying to process.

Preliminary work has been slow as the lenders, and Nama, have struggled to deal with complex valuations in a market with no buyers, and grappled with tricky legal and financial due diligence on title and loan files, with dedicated teams of staff in each lender.

Nama has missed three deadlines to process the transfers, the most recent being yesterday.

March 5th has been set as the next deadline when the first transfers will begin, though not all of the loans connected to the top 10 will move on the day. Minister for Finance Brian Lenihan has said the top 10 borrowers will be transferred by the end of next month.

As revealed first by The Irish Times last week, they are developers Liam Carroll, Bernard McNamara, Seán Mulryan of Ballymore, property financier Derek Quinlan, Joe O’Reilly, the developer behind the Dundrum Shopping Centre in Dublin; Paddy McKillen, owner of the Jervis Street Shopping Centre in Dublin; Treasury Holdings (which is owned by Johnny Ronan and Richard Barrett); Cork developer Michael O’Flynn; Dublin builder Gerry Gannon, co-owner of the K Club golf resort in Co Kildare; and Galway businessman Gerry Barrett, owner of Ashford Castle in Co Mayo and G Hotel in Galway.

The financial institutions are awaiting acquisition schedules outlining the specific loans that Nama will acquire as well as the crucial “haircut” to be applied to each.

Once known, this will allow the banks to assess the losses to be incurred on the discounted sales, which will trigger a requirement for capital to meet the shortfall.

State-owned Anglo Irish Bank faces the most pressing capital need as it is moving the largest amount in the first wave – close to €10 billion of the €30-€35 billion it will eventually transfer.

Allied Irish Banks is moving more than €3 billion in the first wave, Bank of Ireland over €2 billion, Irish Nationwide just shy of €1 billion and EBS building society about €150 million.

The commission will assess the compatibility of the transferred loans as well as the actual transfer prices when they are passed on by the Government to Brussels. These reviews include mechanisms to allow for the claw back of money in case of overpayments.

The lenders are already preparing the paperwork for the second and third waves of transfers, though they have pressed Nama to reduce the level of information demanded by the agency.

Given the volume of paperwork and the scale of the sums involved, processing the top 10 borrowers will preoccupy Nama and the banks for most of next month.

As with all complex transactions the devil is in the detail

Two points that immediately spring out of this article is the inbuilt reviews that include a claw back facility on possible overpayments

This will have consequences for the Banks balance sheets as this clearly implies a possible debt !

The second point is that the banks seem to be reluctant to give full details and are pressing NAMA “to reduce the level of information demanded by NAMA”

This cannot be allowed, under any circumstances

 

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