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Posts tagged ‘Dow Jones Transportation Average’

Wealthbuilder Market Brief 1st March 2013 (Christopher Quigley)

By: Christopher Quigley

What a market. Even the most experienced traders  that I know are having a difficult time getting a handle on what is happening.  Wednesday’s market action caught a lot of folk napping. Monday’s 216 point drop in the Dow Industrials  convinced many that finally the much anticipated market “correction” had  arrived.

The slight “uptick” on Tuesday was a classic VIX buy  signal but it turned out to be a trap. Those traders who shorted the market on  the 26th were pulverized by the bullish 175 Dow point move on the 27th.

What can we make of such whiplash moves?

For me, regardless of the economy, the movement of  the market is understandable when you assess it through the paradigm of Dow  Theory. The market is powering forward because technically it is very strong.  This strength was first indicated by the 128 point breakout in the Dow  Transports on the second of January. Prior to this the Dow 20 had traded within  a trading line for nearly a year. It was perfectly clear to Dow Theory  aficionados that the momentum and the direction of any breakout from this “range  line” would be highly significant. The 307 point follow through move on the Dow  Industrials on the same day as the Trannies breakout confirmed the trend. With  Dow Theory  “ a trend once in place  continues until both indices confirm otherwise”. Nothing has happened in the  last few days to alter this January bull move. Thus the correct trading  strategy at the moment is to go long on pullbacks not short “potential” tops.

full report Wealthbuilder Market Brief 1st March 2013

Market Forging Higher, Not Yet Warning of a Top

By Sam Collins

One of the remarkable technical events of the past 12 months is the breakout and blast-off of the Dow Jones Transportation Average. On Tuesday, the index set a new all-time high after breaking from a 10-month consolidation in early December.

RSI is somewhat overbought, and Tuesday’s spike to new highs could lead to some profit-taking. But the momentum of this remarkable performance is usually predictive of a better-performing economy, and thus, a pullback in this or any index should be viewed as a buying opportunity.

Conclusion: Despite the lack of volume, stocks appear headed to new highs, boosted by better-than-expected retail sales and the anticipation of a better economic climate. Even the breakdown of the most influential technology stock of the decade (Apple), the fiscal cliff, and the threat of a U.S. bond default have failed to stop the advance………….

full article at source: http://investorplace.com/2013/01/daily-stock-market-news-market-forging-higher-not-yet-warning-of-a-top/?sid=KE8137&cp=OZDT&ct=201301116&cc=eletter&en=4524897

Wealthbuilder.ie Market Brief Jan 2011

15th. January 2011

By Christopher Quigley

There can be no true recovery in the American stock market without a recovery in   real estate. The property companies that I follow are all showing signs of solid strength and momentum.

This significant development indicates that the bull trend that commenced in March 2009, though in overbought territory at the moment and due a correction, is still very much in place.

Accordingly we will probably see the former highs in the Dow 30, Dow 20, NASDAQ 100 and S & P 5600 tested this year and on balance theses former key technical points will be breached. Thus nearly two years after the move initially commenced a formal Dow Theory “New Bull Market Buy Signal” can finally be announced to the world.

Dow Jones Transport Index


History of the Dow Jones Transports Index


The Dow Jones Industrial Average is the best-known U.S. stock index, but not the oldest. The Dow Jones Transportation Average has that honor.

The first Dow Jones stock index, assembled in 1884 by Charles H. Dow, co-founder of Dow Jones & Company, was composed of nine railroads, including the New York Central and Union Pacific, and two non-rails, Pacific Mail Steamship and Western Union. That was the ancestor of today’s transportation average.

The iron horse powered the U.S. economy in the late 19th century. “The really strong companies at that time were primarily railroads,” says Richard Stillman, professor emeritus of the University of New Orleans.

It wasn’t until 1896 that the Dow Jones Industrial Average appeared. The same year, Mr. Dow published a list of 20 “active” stocks, 18 of which were rails-the direct predecessor of the transportation average. On Sept. 8, 1896, it stood at 48.55.

Over the years, railroads such as Union Pacific (the only remaining original stock) have been joined in the average by the likes of Delta Air Lines, Federal Express and Ryder System.

The story of the rails in this century is one of pride, fall and partial revival. In 1916, 254,000 miles of rail lines crisscrossed the country, nearly twice the current figure. But regulation of prices and “featherbedding” by unions stunted railroads, says Richard Sylla, an economic historian at New York University. The stagnant industry was pounded by competition from trucks, revitalized waterways and, finally, airplanes.

According to Professor Sylla, the Pennsylvania Railroad was the country’s biggest corporation in the 1870s. A century later, its descendant, Penn Central, filed for bankruptcy.

Since 1980, deregulation has brought a revival of sorts. Railroad employment has fallen nearly 60 percent, but ton-miles shipped and the industry’s net income have soared.

Dow Theory

An elaborate analytical system dubbed Dow Theory (so named by people who followed Mr. Dow, but not by Mr. Dow himself) holds that the Dow Jones Transportation Average must “confirm” the movement of the industrial average for a market trend to have staying power. If the industrials reach a new high, the transports would need to reach a new high to “confirm” the broad trend. The trend reverses when both averages experience sharp downturns at around the same time. If they diverge for example, if the industrial average keeps climbing while the transports decline watch out!

The underlying fundamentals of the theory hold that the industrials make and the transports take. If the transports aren’t taking what the industrials are making, it portends economic weakness and market problems, Dow Theorists maintain.

For more information  you might like to look in on  www.wealthbuilder.ie

Attached is the latest information on the US ecomomy

Rail+Time+Indicators+May+2010 PDF

Rail Time Indicators is a non-technical summary of many of the key economic indicators

potentially of interest to U.S. freight railroads. It is issued monthly free of charge by the

Policy and Economics Department of the Association of American Railroads

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