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Archive for the ‘Joan Burton’ Category

Lies and dam Lies from Brian Lenihan!

Quotes from Brian Lenihan since the bank guarantee:

Source http://www.thestory.ie


photo Machholz

On Breakfast with Newstalk, April 26 2010.

First of all, that’s the position in 2009, Eurostat hasn’t decided it yet, that’s our assesment of how they will decide it, we’ll still argue the toss with them. We have to deal with 2010 yet, but let’s assume that you’re right for a minute and that all the €8bn has to be added on in 2010. Let’s assume that. We won’t be borrowing the money, we’ll be borrowing the money over a period of ten or fifteen years. We’ll actually be up fronting – in accountancy terms – the figure, but we will not in fact be borrowing… – April 26 2010.

Also on Breakfast with Newstalk

Now that I’m the shareholder in Irish Nationwide I will clearly ensure that whatever money is owed by Mr Fingleton is paid by Mr Fingleton. – April 26 2010.

Also on Breakfast with Newstalk

BL: No, no, listen, listen. This not good for the country , and it’s inaccurate. If next year we’re obliged to include the €8bn, the €8bn will not actually be borrowed next year the device of the promissory note means we borrow…

Ivan Yates: No, I know the promissory note is over ten years. You’re missing the point…

BL: No you’re missing the point! This is an accounting device! This is not real borrowing! What the markets look at is real borrowing. Not accountancy devices… – April 26 2010.

Speaking to media…

“The decisive and bold steps we have taken are not popular; and the honest and full disclosure by the Government and its agencies of the appalling mess we have uncovered within our banks has shocked the nation,” Mr Lenihan told the Dail.  “But I do believe that there is recognition among the citizens that the measures we have taken are necessary. And I believe the work of NAMA in cleaning up the banks’ balance sheets and forcing them and their borrowers to face up to their losses is winning the respect of the public.” – April 21 2010,  Irish Independent

“One of the good things about the steep discount, averaging 47 per cent, is that the residential property market will now be stabilised at a realistic level… You can now buy in confidence that the price is realistic.” – April 4 2010, Irish Independent

[Submitted by CO’D]:

The Financial Regulator has advised that all the financial institutions in Ireland will continue to be subject to normal ongoing  regulatory requirements. This very important initiative by the Government is designed to safeguard the Irish financial system and to remedy a serious disturbance in the economy caused by the recent turmoil in the international financial markets. As far as the question of ‘moral hazard’ is concerned, it will be a priority for the Government to ensure that the highest regulatory standards and standards of corporate governance apply in all of the institutions concerned including in relation to lending practices to safeguard the interests of taxpayers against any risk of financial loss. – Department of Finance statement, September 30 2008

[Submitted by CO’D]: During Dáil debate on credit institutions and financial support,

Olivia Mitchell (FG): We need to see the terms and conditions to know what will happen with regard to these people. Is there any requirement for the banks to restructure their loans? Will they be allowed to make a massive number of repossessions and have fire sales, driving house prices down further and sending the economy into even deeper recession? Has the Government any plan to deal with this?

Brian Lenihan: This is the plan.

Olivia Mitchell: […] However, we need a return to the banks of old — to the image we had of them as being dull, staid, boring, cautious and careful. We no longer have that image. What is the Government’s plan to create the conditions that will ensure this happens? What will happen to restore confidence in the banking system? If we do not restore confidence in the banking system, what the Minister is doing now——. I do not know what the Minister is laughing at.

Brian Lenihan: I am not laughing. I am allowed to smile. – October 1 2008

[Submitted by DC]: As reported by Simon Carswell in The Irish Times…

MINISTER FOR Finance Brian Lenihan has said the bank guarantee scheme was “a necessary first step” and “the cheapest bailout in the world so far”.

Mr Lenihan said the guarantee was “the cheapest bailout” compared with bank rescues in other countries, including the UK and the US, where “billions and billions of taxpayers’ money are being poured into financial institutions” – October 24 2008

Irish Times…

“We are not rushing into the banks without knowing precisely what the position is in those banks” – Nov 20 2008

During the Stabilisation of Public Finances debate, Dáil Eireann

In the context of any capitalisation the due diligence exercise will yield further information to enable us to do a far more precise identification of risk before we formulate policy on it. I would be reluctant to commit the taxpayer on any issue connected with risk without a full and definitive assessment of the risk in the institutions themselves and we must await this assessment. – Feb 5 2009

Following the publication of Anglo Irish Bank’s 2009 results. Minister Lenihan said he welcomed the increased scrutiny of Anglo as an opportunity to bring openness to the bank…

“which will ultimately allow us to draw a line under past activities”. “It is an opportunity for Anglo to employ a fully transparent approach to addressing the inappropriate activities that took place at the bank and provide comprehensive details to all stakeholders who deal with Anglo and who deal with Irish financial institutions generally.” – Irish Independent, Feb 21 2009

When challenged as to why he was not nationalising banks (at this time the State had already nationalised Anglo Irish Bank and taken a 25 per cent stake in Bank of Ireland and AIB).

“I do really want to scotch the idea that there are huge risks to the taxpayer in the valuation process because we are not nationalising these institutions.” – Irish Times,
May 18 2009

Nama Bill, Dáil Eireann.

NAMA will ensure that credit flows again to viable businesses and households by cleansing the balance sheets of Irish banks. This is essential for economic recovery and the generation of employment. It will ensure that we avoid the Japanese outcome of zombie banks that are just ticking over and not making a vibrant contribution to economic growth. – Sept 16 2009

Nama Bill, Dáil Eireann.

I am not prepared to contemplate the establishment of an entity that has no responsibility or accountability to this House. – Sept 16 2009

Nama Bill, Dáil Eireann

Nothing in the NAMA legislation will result in more repossessions of family homes. – October 14 2009

On the nationalisation of Anglo, during a debate on banking regulation in the Dáil

This decisive step was taken to safeguard the interest of the depositors of Anglo Irish Bank and the stability of the economy. I want to assure the House that this decisive step was taken to ensure the new nationalised bank will collect all debts due from persons who owe moneys to the institution. – Feb 18 2009

In response to written question from Kathleen Lynch

Taking account of the advice received the Government has proceeded with a comprehensive recapitalisation of Ireland’s two main banks and with the nationalisation of Anglo Irish Bank. The Government is also in discussions with the other covered institutions, Irish Life & Permanent, Educational Building Society and Irish National Building Society concerning their respective positions. – Feb 18 2009

In response to a written question from Arthur Morgan

The recapitalised banks have reconfirmed their commitment to an extensive credit package which will help to increase lending capacity to small and medium enterprises by 10% and to provide an additional 30% capacity for lending to first time buyers in 2009. The credit package also provides for a €100m environmental and clean energy innovation fund to be established by each bank. All the steps that I have outlined have been taken by the Government to ensure that the public interest is secured so that the financial system in Ireland meets the everyday financial needs of individuals, businesses and the overall economy. – March 26 2009

Written answer to Arthur Morgan

Our approach will facilitate a sustained flow of credit on a commercial basis to individuals, households and businesses in the real economy. – July 8 2009

When questioned on the delays in implementing Nama legislation on Morning Ireland

“We can’t have a lawyers’ bonanza and that is another good reason why we have to get this right.” – May 18 2009

Kicker; written answer to Joan Burton

Arthur Cox solicitors have been engaged by my Department since September 2008 to provide advice in relation to general banking matters including the Bank Guarantee scheme, the nationalisation of Anglo Irish Bank and the recapitalisation of AIB, Bank of Ireland and Anglo Irish Bank. The company was paid €1,628,024 in 2008 and €2,254,263 has been paid to date in 2009. The sum of €5.4 million has been allocated for legal advice for 2009 and an estimate of €3 million has been set aside for legal advice in 2010.

PriceWaterhouseCoopers was retained by the Financial Regulator in late 2008 to assist the Financial Regulator with a review of the financial and capital positions of Irish banks and to enable the Financial Regulator to advise the Government on what action needed to be taken. The work undertaken involved an initial high level assessment of the capital and liquidity levels of the institutions, stress testing of the institution’s loan portfolios over a three year period, and review the valuation of properties held as collateral against the main property loans.

The total fees paid by the Financial Regulator to the company in respect of the work was €3.8 million, which has been completed. In addition, the Financial Regulator has paid €0.84 million to Jones Lang La Salle for financial and property consultancy services in relation to the Bank Guarantee Scheme.

The National Treasury Management Agency paid a total of €7.3 million to Merrill Lynch for investment banking advice up to 30 June 2009. Following a competitive tender process in July, Rothschild have now been awarded the contract for investment banking advice. The NTMA has also retained an economist however the terms of his contract with the NTMA were agreed on a confidential basis. In addition, following a competitive tender process, the NTMA engaged HSBC and Arthur Cox to provide advice in relation to NAMA. – Sept 22 2009


NOTE: I’ve gone through the Dáil record and archives of the Times and Indo, but haven’t listened to radio or TV interviews. If anyone has a bit of time to go back and listen to a Morning Ireland/Prime Time/The Last Word/Whatever interview… t’would be useful.

* a word members of our Government like to use when scripting excuses for the negative outcomes that result from badly implemented policy or regulation. Usually follows “unforeseen”.

NAMA up-date

 


 

Up to 25 bank directors will be forced out under the NAMA deal.

The Cabinet yesterday signed off on the latest draft of the laws to bring in the Government’s ‘bad bank’.

Ministers agreed on a way of sharing the risk between the banks and the taxpayer.

It includes a form of delayed payment to the institutions for their toxic loans. In a significant departure, Fianna Fail last night allowed the Greens to take credit for the changes to the NAMA bill.

Part of the package of measures to reassure the public is the removal of the remaining directors from bank boards, as revealed in the Irish Independent yesterday. The Greens’ demand on the introduction of new bank board’s was agreed in principle by ministers, but precisely how it will be done has still to be worked out. Communications Minister Eamon Ryan stressed that the removal of the directors would be “an orderly changeover” over the course of two years.

All non-executive directors of the banks participating in NAMA will, if appointed prior to 2008, be required to step down. That will affect up to 25 bank directors in AIB, Bank of Ireland, EBS, Irish Nationwide and Anglo Irish Bank.

Irish Life and Permanent directors will not have to resign as it is highly unlikely to apply to be covered by NAMA.

Mr Ryan indicated the Greens pushed hard with their Fianna Fail counterparts to get their proposals included.

And he hinted that his party will play a greater part in the broader development of government policy from now on.

A large number of directors of the banks have remained in place since the crisis began last September, at the time of state bank guarantee.

Many of the non-executive directors command in excess of €100,000 for sitting on the board.

The Greens are also claiming credit for a windfall tax of 80pc, on profits gained from increases in land value due to re-zoning decisions, to discourage property speculation.

The party is also saying it is responsible for linking planning changes into the NAMA process and bringing in new rules governing corporate practice in the banks. The junior coalition partners were allowed, by Fianna Fail, to announce the changes. The party has a meeting with its grassroots members at the weekend to discuss the NAMA legislation.

The Greens being giving a free run is a sign Taoiseach Brian Cowen is conscious of the need to keep his partners onside to prevent the Government from collapsing.

The Greens’ ministers will offer the cull of directors, the reassurances to the taxpayer and the planning changes as a sweetener to members to back NAMA. The second draft of the NAMA legislation will be published today.

Secretive

Officials are still working on rules to force the banks to lend money to businesses after NAMA takes the toxic development loans off their books.

Meanwhile, Fine Gael called on the Government to publish the “NAMA 1,500” — the people that will be beneficiaries of the NAMA plan, so the taxpayer can see who is being bailed out.

FG finance spokesman Richard Bruton said at its core NAMA is a “secretive, tax-funded, politically directed work-out process for 1,500 of the most powerful, well connected business people in Ireland“.

The IBOA also has called for sweeping changes to the make-up of bank boards as the finance union give a conditional support for the Government’s ‘bad bank’ plan.

– Fionnan Sheahan and Joe Brennan

Ruairi is on the case!

Dear Thomas,

 

Thank you for your email regarding NAMA. The Labour Party is closely examining the draft legislation, which is really a discussion document, but I expect to see significant changes when the actual legislation is published sometime in the next fortnight.

 

My colleague, Joan Burton TD, has written to Brian Lenihan seeking clarification on a number of issues and will be raising these directly with him at Monday’s Finance Committee meeting. In particular, she has sought clarification on the crucial issue of asset valuation, which appears vague and at the discretion of the Minister.

 

The legislation as it currently stands appears designed to facilitate a significant transfer of wealth from taxpayers to bank investors. Labour has been consistent in its approach to the Fianna Fail banking crisis since last Autumn, putting the ‘taxpayer first’.

 

We opposed the reckless bank guarantee. We opposed pumping €7bn of taxpayers money into the banks without securing fundamental reform and regime change at management level. We opposed the nationalisation of Anglo Irish Bank which bailed out its bondholders.

 

The Labour Party advocates the nationalisation of the banks as the least risky and least costly approach to restoring the flow of credit in our economy without putting future generations in hock for billions. We have serious concerns with respect to Dáil oversight and the extent of discretionary powers given to the Minister. I expect that the Labour Party will not be supporting NAMA in its current form.

 

Yours sincerely,

Ruairi Quinn TD

Labour Party Spokesperson for Education and Science

Leinster House

Kildare Street

Dublin 2

01 618 3434

Just a Minute Brian not so Fast!

Reply to Joan Burton TD.

Dear Joan,

 

Thank you for keeping us in the picture and your support is deeply

Appreciated by us all your invitation has being passed on

A correspondent will be in touch with the press office on behalf of Ireland’s newest community’s web portal, designed to reach all the residents associations and small communities in the country.

When finished this portal will encourage citizens to become reporters for their own communities and all this under the netzoners portal

Each “community reporter” will receive a Press ID

 DSC00100


 

And will enjoy the support of hundreds of fellow correspondents through the country!

 

Coverage will be published on the blog www.machholz.wordpress.com as well

Best wishes

Thomas Clarke

For machholz.wordpress.com & netzoners

 

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