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Archive for the ‘Irish Politics’ Category

Brian Lenihan’s statement this morning.

New NAMA adjustments

1. Loans of less than €20m not being transferred now .

2. NAMA debtors to drop from 1500 to 850

3. NAMA to abandon tranches, replaced with one remaining tranche per Participating Institution (PI – AIB, Anglo, BoI, EBS, INBS) Irish Nationwide Building Society

4. Anglo tranche to be transferred by end of October 2010

5. Loan-by-loan due diligence to continue

6. EU consulted and advised – (But it got EU  approval ?)

7. Loss of sub-€20m loans to reduce NAMA portfolio from €80bn at par value to €73.4bn

8. A 67% haircut expected on remaining Anglo tranche of €19bn (remaining Anglo tranche of €19bn plus T1+2 = €35bn and Anglo was supposed to be selling loans and sub €20m loans are now excluded – is €19bn right?)

9. Large increases in estimates of haircuts remaining tranches – Anglo 67%, AIB 60%, BoI 42%, EBS 60%, INBS – not shown (why?)

source http://namawinelake.wordpress.com/author/namawinelake/

Irish banks are still in denial

While all the focus has been on losses at Anglo Irish, the other Irish banks are in denial about the scale of State support needed. It is time to face the facts: the three viable banks need over €17 billion, writes PETER MATHEWS 

LAST WEEK, the scary reports of liabilities at Irish banks centred on the colossal Anglo Irish Bank loan losses, the scale of which I (and other analysts) had been only too aware of more than a year ago. The focus on Anglo Irish was understandable, as far as it went. But the banking sector crisis is not just about Anglo. The Government is missing the bigger picture entirely.

The Irish banking system is analogous to a household’s heating/plumbing system with inter-related boilers. The two big boilers are AIB and Bank of Ireland. There are other smaller boilers, including Anglo and Irish Nationwide, which got really badly damaged by using the wrong fuel and, as a result, they’re now broken beyond repair. The correct decision now is to “stop-cock” Anglo and Irish Nationwide out of the overall system, decommission them and wind them down, in an orderly way, over a period of five to seven years.

AIB and Bank of Ireland (BoI) are the economy’s two heavy duty “main boilers”. Both are now in highly unreliable condition, hissing and spluttering and stopping and starting unpredictably. Both need major refits and servicing. They are severely undercapitalised and poorly directed and managed. Yet both persist in pretending they’re in reasonable shape. They are not. And that’s absolutely the case for BoI, notwithstanding the insistent protests that it is okay because it has more or less raised the capital amount indicated as adequate last March.

But that was last March. And last March’s estimates for both AIB and BoI were not enough. BoI needs €6.5 billion, not €3.65 billion. And AIB needs €10 billion, not €7.4 billion.

The proof goes along the following lines. Gross loans in AIB listed for transfer to the National Asset Management Agency (Nama) totalled €24 billion. A (light) 40 per cent writedown on this figure amounts to €9.6 billion, which should be rounded at €10 billion. We note also that AIB will have to absorb large further losses on its mortgage loan book, its corporate loan book and its SME book and also on its personal lending portfolio. In addition, it may well have uncovered exposures on derivatives. For these reasons, and extensive relevant professional experience, I feel conscience bound to point out that AIB definitely needs recapitalisation now of not less than €10 billion. Furthermore, AIB should not be selling its stakes in Polish and US banks. They are the most profitable, cash-flowing parts of AIB. AIB is only doing this as a panic measure to try and plug its deepening capital shortfall.

Similarly, BoI needs a €6.5 billion recapitalisation. Why €6.5 billion? Because in BoI, the listed loans for transfer to Nama were €16 billion. Apply a 40 per cent write down. This amounts to €6.4 billion, which should be rounded to €6.5 billion. All comments applicable to AIB in the preceding paragraph apply also to BoI.

The Educational Building Society (EBS) also needs recapitalisation of €1 billion to cover its loan losses. Four months ago, the Oireachtas Joint Committee on Finance and the Public Service was advised that the three viable banks, AIB, BoI and EBS, needed immediate capital of €10 billion, €6.5 billion and €1 billion. That’s €17.5 billion in total. The question arises: should the State provide all of this on top of the €7 billion already invested in AIB and BoI in 2009? Clearly not. How much of this €17.5 billion should the State invest? Perhaps €11 billion, in appropriate proportions, into AIB, BoI and EBS.

All of this will result in temporary State nationalisation of these three banks. This leads to another question: where will the €6.5 billion balance come from? The State will be in majority control, at levels in excess of 85 per cent, and able to force existing bondholders in AIB, BoI and EBS to take writedowns on their holdings of bonds, while maybe offering them, say, a small debt-for-equity swap as a sweetener to soften the blow. After, say, five years, the banks will have regained reasonable annual-maintainable normal profit levels in the range €3.5 billion to €4 billion, putting the State in a good position to realise, by way of stock exchange or private sales, its investment of €18 billion in these three banks, plus a profit.

Temporary nationalisation of AIB and BoI will merely formalise the reality that, without 100 per cent State support, both are insolvent. Removal of the State guarantee on deposits at this point would lead to a run on the banks’ deposits. However, we see the banks continuing their delusory charade that they are financially sound and independent!

Realism and optimism are essential for recovery. But optimism must be based on reality. As a country we’re facing a stark reality. Protracted denial in the banking industry, the Government, official Ireland and the professions must stop. Unfortunately, the Fianna Fáil-led Government is responsible for the financial destruction of our economy. Regrettably, the Green Party has collaborated in this destruction. These are the facts. The true situation has been denied by the Government for far too long.

Finally, after two years, only in the last few days have the Minister for Finance, the Government and (some of) the banks been forced to admit the true scale of the destruction. What a waste. What a shame.

So let’s stop the stupid denial. Let’s acknowledge the scale of destruction in the Irish-owned banking sector, not just the Anglo Irish story. AIB and BoI have not been honest with us. Their loan losses are also a shock-and-awe story and they’re only being revealed, on the drip, in drawn-out chapters.

Let’s measure truthfully all the appalling financial damage. Let’s insist AIB and BoI are recapitalised at the truthful, honest, correct and much more robust levels (thereby resulting in temporary nationalisation and bondholder participation through bond writedowns) to enable them to make necessary, much larger, loan-loss provisions than they’ve done to date. Let’s reverse the nonsensical, unwieldy Nama project. This can be done speedily and simply. We’ve got to stop what has become a slow-motion Nama/banks bailout nightmare. Let’s roll up our sleeves and face the challenge. And let’s get on with the work of recovery

source http://www.irishtimes.com/newspaper/opinion/2010/0909/1224278513715.html?via=mr

Comment

This is an excelent articel by PETER MATHEWS 

Early August I posted  my disbelief at the figures the EU stress test results for Allied Irish and Bank of Ireland at the time I stated I thought the figures from the EU were false and were conveniently forgetting some serious hidden derivative losses these corrupt institutions’ were keeping off the book through some fancy  account gimmickry  

My figures were for allied Irish were 10 billion and bank of Ireland, I thought 7 billion or there about .So it is nice to see an independent analyst confirm these figures

Comming over the wires I see headlines say

“Ireland has fallen four places to 29th on the list of global competitiveness and its banking system is the least sound of the 139 countries surveyed, according to the World Economic Forum’s annual rankings.”

now what does that tell you ?

Cowen & Lenihan spin doesn’t wash with the markets

SAN FRANCISCO (MarketWatch)

Standard & Poor’s Ratings Services downgraded Ireland’s credit rating Tuesday on concern about the cost of bailing out the country’s ailing banks.
S&P lowered Ireland’s long-term sovereign credit rating to AA- from AA and kept its outlook on negative, suggesting the ratings agency could cut again.
The downgrade applies to other ratings that depend on Ireland’s sovereign credit rating, including senior unsecured debt ratings on government-guaranteed securities of Irish banks, S&P noted.
The Irish economy, like many around the globe, is struggling, but well-to-do visitors are returning to the Emerald Isle to take advantage of more attractive pricing for lodging and a chance to enjoy its storied golf links.
“The government’s support of the banking sector represents a substantial and increasing fiscal burden, which in our view will be slow to unwind,” Standard & Poor’s credit analyst Trevor Cullinan said.
The euro /quotes/comstock/21o!x:seurusd (EURUSD 1.2633, +0.0006, +0.0475%) recently traded at $1.2624. That’s lower than it was earlier Tuesday and down from $1.2684 late Monday.
Like several developed countries, Ireland bailed out some of its largest banks in the wake of the 2008 financial crisis. Anglo Irish Bank was nationalized.
The government recently got European Commission approval to inject another 10 billion euros into Anglo Irish Bank, on top of the 14.3 billion euros it already provided. That’s sparked concern Ireland may have to spend more on new support for other banks.
While such bailouts may have averted a much harsher global recession, they have left several developed countries burdened with more debt. Read about the sovereign debt crisis.
90 billion euros
The total cost of Ireland’s support for its banking sector may now reach 90 billion euros ($114 billion), or 58% of GDP, S&P estimated. That’s up from a previous forecast of 80 billion euros.

Comment:

The government’s lies to the markets is not working as we see by the latest Standard & Poor’s Ratings downgraded of Ireland’s credit rating this evening
Anyone that now still believes a single word out of Cowens or Lenihans mouths is guilty of plane stupidity
Surely the people who are backing these two clowns must now begin to question the sanity of their undying support for their pals in Anglo Irish Bank and the NAMA fraud that was set up to bail out the golden circle
These clowns must be stop before we are all totally ruined and condemned to go back to the depression of the 70,s or even the 50,s

New reserve currency

This is big trouble for the USA
WASHINGTON (AP) — Regulators on Friday shut down a Nevada bank, raising to 83 the number of U.S. bank failures this year.
The 83 closures so far this year is more than double the pace set in all of 2009, which was itself a brisk year for shutdowns. By this time last year, regulators had closed 40 banks. The pace has accelerated as banks’ losses mount on loans made for commercial property and development.

The Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. took over Nevada Security Bank, based in Reno, with $480.3 million in assets and $479.8 million in deposits. Umpqua Bank, based in Roseburg, Ore., agreed to assume the assets and deposits of the failed bank.
New reserve currency
We in Ireland are still bailing out bankrupt banks at the cost billions we don’t have causing economic depression for this and the next generation!
With 52 thousand students coming out of our universities and no jobs to go to
alone along with 100,000 people all ready left the country ,and another 53 thousand students leaving secondary education this year
How many of them are going into apprenticeships, jobs or is it emigration for the majority for them
The Unelected Cowen and his band of economic terrorists are helping the top bankers of the state live it up while the rest of us struggle to pay our monthly bills
I say let the bankrupt banks pay their own bills and allow them to fail, just like the Americans are doing in the land of Free markets
Allowing the crooks in the Dail to plunder our natural resources and the wealth of future generations is a crime I personally do not want to be responsible for, when our children ask what you did to prevent it I can show I was active in my opposition and I made a stand
What can you say you did??
It is the responsibility of each and every one of us to oppose this band of thieves we must stand up and take action
Do not just stand by and allow our country to be destroyed by the current government who have sold out to the faceless bondholders in Germany , France and England
Stand up and Fight back now!
Put yourself up for election do not give you vote to any of the current TD’s
We need new blood in the Dail and not Family dynasties
We want a general election now and we need a new community party made up of new local people from ordinary backgrounds that will work for an average wage and not clock up huge self given perks, ending up as millionaires while the rest of us struggle to pay for these perks & pensions
We need real servants of the people and not leach’s sucking the rest of us dry like some of the current shower of TD’s are doing
The next general election must end Gombeenisem for good.
Promise yourself this and we just might save Ireland!

The Markets do not believe you Mr.Cowen

 

 

Bank of Ireland [IRE  3.61    -0.14  (-3.73%)   ]
: Stay away from IRE, Cramer said. He

likened it to
National Bank of Greece
[NBG  2.23    -0.03  (-1.33%)   ]
and
Allied Irish Bank
[AIB  2.17    -0.06  (-2.69%)   ]
and said all of them “bad banks” that need
to reconstitute their balance sheets, “which means potential dilution for shareholders.”

 


Latest news is that Cramer is not a fan of any of the Irish Banks.

Bank of Ireland (IRE) and the Allied Irish Banks (AIB)

According to Cramer the Irish banks are like the National Bank of Greece so much for turning corners

Allowing Gangsters run Banks is one thing but allowing Gangsters to run a country is just unforgivable

Cowen and Lenihan must go!

Preliminary Report Into Ireland’s Banking Crisis 31 May 2010

After reading the Preliminary Report into Ireland’s Banking Crisis one can only come to the conclusion that Cowen and Lenihan are Guilty of “Gross Incompetence and Dereliction of Duty”
And should resign immediately and be brought before the courts
on charges of economic treason !

Preliminary Report Into Ireland’s Banking Crisis 31 May 2010

Billions for NAMA and sod the rest of us!

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