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Archive for the ‘Irish National Debt’ Category

Hangover for Irish Banks

Central Bank of Ireland located on Dame Street...

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MONDAY’S jump in banking stocks was followed by a hangover yesterday as the country’s lenders pared most of the gains posted in the session.

Bank of Ireland fell 4pc to 69c after Standard & Poor’s (S&P) cut its outlook to “negative” from “stable” and warned that the lender faces “considerable challenges” restoring its credit profile as the Irish economy recovers slowly.

“Our view is that the Irish economy is likely to recover only quite slowly, with household finances remaining stretched, asset prices unlikely to start appreciating materially for a couple of years and credit demand remaining muted for many years,” S&P said in a gloomy forecast.

Allied Irish Banks, fresh from celebrating the sale of its stake in Bank Zachodni, tumbled 4.6pc to 75c as ING Group said the bank “is not out of the woods yet”, following the sale and is still “likely” to end up in majority state ownership.

Another stock feeling groggy yesterday was Norkom which tumbled 15.8pc to 80c, extending the previous session’s 24 decline following a profit warning.

CRH was another loser, slipping 1.9pc to €13.20 after the building materials company was downgraded to “neutral” from “outperform” at Credit Suisse by equity analyst Harry Goad. His target price is €14 per share.

The ISEQ ended the session down 20.44 points, or 0.7pc, to 2795.04 points. Elsewhere in Europe, stocks were little changed with the Stoxx Europe 600 Index close to a four-month high, as better-than-estimated US retail sales offset a selloff in utilities and a slump in German investor confidence.

Stocks initially rallied after a government report showed sales at US retailers climbed in August for a second consecutive month. Separate figures from the ZEW Centre for European Economic Research showed German investor confidence fell more than economists forecast to a 19-month low in September.

In the UK inflation unexpectedly exceeded the government’s 3pc limit for a sixth month in August; while a UK housing-market gauge fell more than economists expected in August to the lowest since May 2009, according to the Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors.

Electricity companies RWE and E.ON dropped after brokers downgraded Germany’s largest utilities. Philips lost 3.9pc after the world’s biggest lighting company set new financial targets for the next five years. Gamesa Corporacion Tecnologica paced advancing shares amid takeover speculation.

ARM Holdings retreated 4pc after the company said a number of executives sold shares in the UK designer of semiconductors that power Apple’s iPhone.

Ladbrokes dropped 1.2pc after Goldman Sachs downgraded its recommendation on the bookie to “sell” from “neutral.”

– Thomas Molloy

Irish Independent

 

Comment:

This comes as no surprise to me as I have pointed out in previous posts the two main banks are from any normal booking keeping standards, they are both bankrupt

They are engaged in hiding enormous losses behind dioubious financial instruments called derivates as they are not going to disclose these losses

I believe they are trying to drip feed the markets over the next 3-5 years if they can get the time from the government or they will try to pass them off to NAMA

There is some credence to this method as NAMA is the ideal vehicle to do so through the Toxic toilet that is Anglo Irish Bank

Stay away from Irish  bank shares as I expect the State will eventually end up owing a majority holding of Allied Irish Bank and possibly a 49% stake holding of Bank of Ireland at best!

Irish banks are still in denial

While all the focus has been on losses at Anglo Irish, the other Irish banks are in denial about the scale of State support needed. It is time to face the facts: the three viable banks need over €17 billion, writes PETER MATHEWS 

LAST WEEK, the scary reports of liabilities at Irish banks centred on the colossal Anglo Irish Bank loan losses, the scale of which I (and other analysts) had been only too aware of more than a year ago. The focus on Anglo Irish was understandable, as far as it went. But the banking sector crisis is not just about Anglo. The Government is missing the bigger picture entirely.

The Irish banking system is analogous to a household’s heating/plumbing system with inter-related boilers. The two big boilers are AIB and Bank of Ireland. There are other smaller boilers, including Anglo and Irish Nationwide, which got really badly damaged by using the wrong fuel and, as a result, they’re now broken beyond repair. The correct decision now is to “stop-cock” Anglo and Irish Nationwide out of the overall system, decommission them and wind them down, in an orderly way, over a period of five to seven years.

AIB and Bank of Ireland (BoI) are the economy’s two heavy duty “main boilers”. Both are now in highly unreliable condition, hissing and spluttering and stopping and starting unpredictably. Both need major refits and servicing. They are severely undercapitalised and poorly directed and managed. Yet both persist in pretending they’re in reasonable shape. They are not. And that’s absolutely the case for BoI, notwithstanding the insistent protests that it is okay because it has more or less raised the capital amount indicated as adequate last March.

But that was last March. And last March’s estimates for both AIB and BoI were not enough. BoI needs €6.5 billion, not €3.65 billion. And AIB needs €10 billion, not €7.4 billion.

The proof goes along the following lines. Gross loans in AIB listed for transfer to the National Asset Management Agency (Nama) totalled €24 billion. A (light) 40 per cent writedown on this figure amounts to €9.6 billion, which should be rounded at €10 billion. We note also that AIB will have to absorb large further losses on its mortgage loan book, its corporate loan book and its SME book and also on its personal lending portfolio. In addition, it may well have uncovered exposures on derivatives. For these reasons, and extensive relevant professional experience, I feel conscience bound to point out that AIB definitely needs recapitalisation now of not less than €10 billion. Furthermore, AIB should not be selling its stakes in Polish and US banks. They are the most profitable, cash-flowing parts of AIB. AIB is only doing this as a panic measure to try and plug its deepening capital shortfall.

Similarly, BoI needs a €6.5 billion recapitalisation. Why €6.5 billion? Because in BoI, the listed loans for transfer to Nama were €16 billion. Apply a 40 per cent write down. This amounts to €6.4 billion, which should be rounded to €6.5 billion. All comments applicable to AIB in the preceding paragraph apply also to BoI.

The Educational Building Society (EBS) also needs recapitalisation of €1 billion to cover its loan losses. Four months ago, the Oireachtas Joint Committee on Finance and the Public Service was advised that the three viable banks, AIB, BoI and EBS, needed immediate capital of €10 billion, €6.5 billion and €1 billion. That’s €17.5 billion in total. The question arises: should the State provide all of this on top of the €7 billion already invested in AIB and BoI in 2009? Clearly not. How much of this €17.5 billion should the State invest? Perhaps €11 billion, in appropriate proportions, into AIB, BoI and EBS.

All of this will result in temporary State nationalisation of these three banks. This leads to another question: where will the €6.5 billion balance come from? The State will be in majority control, at levels in excess of 85 per cent, and able to force existing bondholders in AIB, BoI and EBS to take writedowns on their holdings of bonds, while maybe offering them, say, a small debt-for-equity swap as a sweetener to soften the blow. After, say, five years, the banks will have regained reasonable annual-maintainable normal profit levels in the range €3.5 billion to €4 billion, putting the State in a good position to realise, by way of stock exchange or private sales, its investment of €18 billion in these three banks, plus a profit.

Temporary nationalisation of AIB and BoI will merely formalise the reality that, without 100 per cent State support, both are insolvent. Removal of the State guarantee on deposits at this point would lead to a run on the banks’ deposits. However, we see the banks continuing their delusory charade that they are financially sound and independent!

Realism and optimism are essential for recovery. But optimism must be based on reality. As a country we’re facing a stark reality. Protracted denial in the banking industry, the Government, official Ireland and the professions must stop. Unfortunately, the Fianna Fáil-led Government is responsible for the financial destruction of our economy. Regrettably, the Green Party has collaborated in this destruction. These are the facts. The true situation has been denied by the Government for far too long.

Finally, after two years, only in the last few days have the Minister for Finance, the Government and (some of) the banks been forced to admit the true scale of the destruction. What a waste. What a shame.

So let’s stop the stupid denial. Let’s acknowledge the scale of destruction in the Irish-owned banking sector, not just the Anglo Irish story. AIB and BoI have not been honest with us. Their loan losses are also a shock-and-awe story and they’re only being revealed, on the drip, in drawn-out chapters.

Let’s measure truthfully all the appalling financial damage. Let’s insist AIB and BoI are recapitalised at the truthful, honest, correct and much more robust levels (thereby resulting in temporary nationalisation and bondholder participation through bond writedowns) to enable them to make necessary, much larger, loan-loss provisions than they’ve done to date. Let’s reverse the nonsensical, unwieldy Nama project. This can be done speedily and simply. We’ve got to stop what has become a slow-motion Nama/banks bailout nightmare. Let’s roll up our sleeves and face the challenge. And let’s get on with the work of recovery

source http://www.irishtimes.com/newspaper/opinion/2010/0909/1224278513715.html?via=mr

Comment

This is an excelent articel by PETER MATHEWS 

Early August I posted  my disbelief at the figures the EU stress test results for Allied Irish and Bank of Ireland at the time I stated I thought the figures from the EU were false and were conveniently forgetting some serious hidden derivative losses these corrupt institutions’ were keeping off the book through some fancy  account gimmickry  

My figures were for allied Irish were 10 billion and bank of Ireland, I thought 7 billion or there about .So it is nice to see an independent analyst confirm these figures

Comming over the wires I see headlines say

“Ireland has fallen four places to 29th on the list of global competitiveness and its banking system is the least sound of the 139 countries surveyed, according to the World Economic Forum’s annual rankings.”

now what does that tell you ?

You want to know who I am?

This article was sent in this morning and I thought it might be of interest to some of you.

I know I recognize lot of this man’s current life’s problems.
The sordid intervention of derivatives in all of our lives will sometime soon have to be faced up to
We are approaching the event horizon of this apocalyptical event
Everything is been sucked in and when it has consumed everything we will see the mother of all bubbles burst. With the announcement of the Anglo Irish Banks half yearly results and the results of Irish Life & Permanent, there is no mention of their derivative positions and the catastrophic losses there are still hiding from the public (Proof Anglo Irish deals in derivatives (CFD,s) you only need to read this article in the Irish times )http://www.irishtimes.com/newspaper/finance/2010/0827/1224277688678.html?via=rel

with the full knowledge of the current corrupt government
you have been warned!

By John Mele :
You want to know who I am? First, I’ll tell you who I was.
I joined the Marines when I was 18, went to Vietnam when I was 19, was an 0331 machine gunner, survived a tour of duty in heat and humidity in the mountains of northern South Vietnam near the DMZ. My rear base, the Rockpile, was the most remote base in Vietnam at that time, or so we were told. I survived that war and when I got home I used the GI Bill to get into the Boston Architectural Center, a night school of Architecture. I worked days a few years as a construction laborer and then as an office boy in an architectural office. I got married, was accepted to the University of Oregon and got my BA in architecture in ’77, worked, moved a few times (due to recessions), had two beautiful daughters, raised my family, etc.
After Nam I straightened out, as they say, and sailed a pretty solid course even when the seas of the economy were rough. We had our ups and downs, weathered financial recessions, lost one home and built another, finally settled in Knoxville, TN where I had my own architectural business mainly because I couldn’t work in a cubicle with 400 other architects.
But in ’09 that all changed. This is who I am now.
I am a former Marine, Vietnam war veteran, mad as hell and about to lose my home again. As far as I could tell, our entire financial system collapsed. I mean take forty to fifty years of “economic progress” and just dump it. That is in essence what happened. Many are still clinging to it, hoping for its revival. Something will recover but that something will never be what it was before. In ’09 they changed all the rules. The jobs disappeared, gone to China and India. Guys like me and those before us built this great land and were no longer needed. The bridges, the skyscrapers, the industrial centers, the homes, highways, dams and byways, all built by us, was now thrown away as the “financial system” did not need us anymore. Things called “derivatives” took our place. The US auto industry was on the ropes, banks were collapsing, Wall Street was in chaos, and millions saw the future as a place of unemployment or low paying jobs, if one was available.
So, I decided not to follow the same path I’d been on. With no prospects for work and a boiling anger about–what I felt–was a stolen future for me and my country, I decided to take some alternative actions. I had not failed, the system had failed me and I was determined not to give up but also not to be a fool. I was 60 and soon no matter what I did age would get me. Do I go down playing by the ever-changing rules of financial insanity that I was being forced into? Do I take any job and try to keep the home I spent a lifetime working for? In short, do I suck it up again, go to where I must and start over again at 60 and keep my mouth shut and show up for work and do this until I am dead?
Hell, I’d rather charge up a hill and give it my all to save my “SPIRIT”, because that is the most precious part of any of us. Think “Geronimo” and replace it with “Whitehorse” and you get an idea of WHY I planned this. One last gasp, one last charge, one last mission till the forces of my destiny would overtake me. Would I die trying, if so I was willing to face and accept that? Would Whitehorse save me? I had no idea. I had no idea! It all started with a joke I said to my wife. After repeating it a few times it made more sense than what I was seeing around me.

The inequalities of life invade all our lives. In essence we all make decisions within the confines of the hand we are dealt. At age 60 I decided to challenge that hand one last time and in doing so set my SPIRIT FREE.

I am cycling to Whitehorse, on a bike with a 65 pound pack, a 3700 mile trip…I’ll see you there, if I last…

Cowen & Lenihan spin doesn’t wash with the markets

SAN FRANCISCO (MarketWatch)

Standard & Poor’s Ratings Services downgraded Ireland’s credit rating Tuesday on concern about the cost of bailing out the country’s ailing banks.
S&P lowered Ireland’s long-term sovereign credit rating to AA- from AA and kept its outlook on negative, suggesting the ratings agency could cut again.
The downgrade applies to other ratings that depend on Ireland’s sovereign credit rating, including senior unsecured debt ratings on government-guaranteed securities of Irish banks, S&P noted.
The Irish economy, like many around the globe, is struggling, but well-to-do visitors are returning to the Emerald Isle to take advantage of more attractive pricing for lodging and a chance to enjoy its storied golf links.
“The government’s support of the banking sector represents a substantial and increasing fiscal burden, which in our view will be slow to unwind,” Standard & Poor’s credit analyst Trevor Cullinan said.
The euro /quotes/comstock/21o!x:seurusd (EURUSD 1.2633, +0.0006, +0.0475%) recently traded at $1.2624. That’s lower than it was earlier Tuesday and down from $1.2684 late Monday.
Like several developed countries, Ireland bailed out some of its largest banks in the wake of the 2008 financial crisis. Anglo Irish Bank was nationalized.
The government recently got European Commission approval to inject another 10 billion euros into Anglo Irish Bank, on top of the 14.3 billion euros it already provided. That’s sparked concern Ireland may have to spend more on new support for other banks.
While such bailouts may have averted a much harsher global recession, they have left several developed countries burdened with more debt. Read about the sovereign debt crisis.
90 billion euros
The total cost of Ireland’s support for its banking sector may now reach 90 billion euros ($114 billion), or 58% of GDP, S&P estimated. That’s up from a previous forecast of 80 billion euros.

Comment:

The government’s lies to the markets is not working as we see by the latest Standard & Poor’s Ratings downgraded of Ireland’s credit rating this evening
Anyone that now still believes a single word out of Cowens or Lenihans mouths is guilty of plane stupidity
Surely the people who are backing these two clowns must now begin to question the sanity of their undying support for their pals in Anglo Irish Bank and the NAMA fraud that was set up to bail out the golden circle
These clowns must be stop before we are all totally ruined and condemned to go back to the depression of the 70,s or even the 50,s

New reserve currency

This is big trouble for the USA
WASHINGTON (AP) — Regulators on Friday shut down a Nevada bank, raising to 83 the number of U.S. bank failures this year.
The 83 closures so far this year is more than double the pace set in all of 2009, which was itself a brisk year for shutdowns. By this time last year, regulators had closed 40 banks. The pace has accelerated as banks’ losses mount on loans made for commercial property and development.

The Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. took over Nevada Security Bank, based in Reno, with $480.3 million in assets and $479.8 million in deposits. Umpqua Bank, based in Roseburg, Ore., agreed to assume the assets and deposits of the failed bank.
New reserve currency
We in Ireland are still bailing out bankrupt banks at the cost billions we don’t have causing economic depression for this and the next generation!
With 52 thousand students coming out of our universities and no jobs to go to
alone along with 100,000 people all ready left the country ,and another 53 thousand students leaving secondary education this year
How many of them are going into apprenticeships, jobs or is it emigration for the majority for them
The Unelected Cowen and his band of economic terrorists are helping the top bankers of the state live it up while the rest of us struggle to pay our monthly bills
I say let the bankrupt banks pay their own bills and allow them to fail, just like the Americans are doing in the land of Free markets
Allowing the crooks in the Dail to plunder our natural resources and the wealth of future generations is a crime I personally do not want to be responsible for, when our children ask what you did to prevent it I can show I was active in my opposition and I made a stand
What can you say you did??
It is the responsibility of each and every one of us to oppose this band of thieves we must stand up and take action
Do not just stand by and allow our country to be destroyed by the current government who have sold out to the faceless bondholders in Germany , France and England
Stand up and Fight back now!
Put yourself up for election do not give you vote to any of the current TD’s
We need new blood in the Dail and not Family dynasties
We want a general election now and we need a new community party made up of new local people from ordinary backgrounds that will work for an average wage and not clock up huge self given perks, ending up as millionaires while the rest of us struggle to pay for these perks & pensions
We need real servants of the people and not leach’s sucking the rest of us dry like some of the current shower of TD’s are doing
The next general election must end Gombeenisem for good.
Promise yourself this and we just might save Ireland!

What if this oil spill was off the coast of Ireland?

 

If this had happened in Irish waters the Government would have told the nation that we were all responsible and we must all put our shoulder to the wheel and help stop this well from leaking any more of our precious oil .They would also blame the single mothers and the Unemployed for using up badly needed financial resources that would otherwise be spent plugging the well.

A call for a national bond would be made and everyone in the work would be made pay a new oil cleanup carbon tax levy and the Unions would tell the members that we have no choice as this is the only option for the country

Gormley would employ a few green pals to count all the dead fish and Ryan would call for a national day of mourning .Brian lenihan would go on national TV to tell us we must tighten out collative belts yet another two notches!
Bertie Ahern would look for another “Dig out” from his pals to help pay his levy!
Having got it he would then seek an exemption from the revenue on the grounds he was a struggling artist!
The Government would then blame the protesters of shell to sea for the disaster and have them all thrown into jail!

Irelands true financial debts are?

Ireland is a basket case and we are not been told about it.

$865 billion is the amount the Irish state owes to the rest of Europe

Greece owes $367 billion. So how does this make us any better off? 
 
 

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