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Bank of Ireland takes bizarre action to prevent the State acquiring more than 50% control

Bank of Ireland takes bizarre action to prevent the State acquiring more than 50% control

namawinelake | November 9, 2010 at 1:27 pm | Categories: NAMA | URL: http://wp.me/pNlCf-M9

 

photo machholz

The State presently owns 36.5% of the ordinary stock of Bank of Ireland thanks to the payment in lieu of cash of the 8% dividend on the €3.5bn “directed” investment from the National Pension Reserve Fund in March 2009 and the conversion of some preference shares to ordinary shares in May 2010. You might recall that in February 2010, BoI paid out 184m ordinary shares to the NPRF on its €3.5bn preference share investment made in March 2009, in lieu of a cash dividend because the pesky EU had forbidden it to make a cash distribution when in receipt of State-aid. Three months later, the NPRF acquired additional ordinary shares in BoI through the rights issue by the bank and the conversion of some €1.7bn of the preference shares to ordinary shares. As part of the rights issue conversion of preference shares the interest rate payable on the remaining €1.8bn of preference shares was to rise from 8% to 10.25%. So that’s how the State this morning owns 36.5% of BoI and has €1.8bn of preference shares yielding 10.25% per annum with the dividend due next February 2010.

Next February 2011, BoI will be required to pay the NPRF €214m – roughly 10.25% of €1.8 (I say roughly because remember we had €3.5bn preference shares earning 8% for about two months of this dividend year and then the 10.25% applies for 10 months approx). We are now waiting almost four months (a record as far as I can tell) for the EU to publish the Decision announced on 17th July, 2010 which set out the conditions for BoI’s restructuring. I’m willing to bet that the EU will allow BoI to start making cash payment for dividends again. Because if they don’t, BoI would need pay the €214m in ordinary shares or at current prices (€0.42 per share with the company having an ordinary share capitalisation of €2.24m), nearly 10% of the company which would bring the State shareholding up from 36.5% to 46.5%. Given the volatility of BoI’s share price, we could easily end up with an ordinary share dividend which would give us 50% of BoI – majority control which seems anathema to the State’s strategy for the banking sector.

And so yesterday in the High Court we witnessed the bizarre spectacle of BoI applying (in simple terms) to be allowed reclassify part of its capital base in such a way that a dividend payment can be made in cash so the horror of the State taking majority control of BoI can be avoided. Of course if economist Morgan Kelly, whose latest jeremiad in yesterday’s Irish Times is correct (and there is sufficient support for his position to suggest he’s not being a crackpot), then the scale of non-NAMA losses in BoI will give us majority State control in the near future anyway. Nonetheless it is interesting to see the legal lengths to which BoI will go to avoid majority ownership in the next three months

Comment:

The Government accepts now that Anglo will cost the taxpayers 34.5 billion and we must accept that AIB and Bank of Ireland will cost at least €30 billion because they were just as bad as Anglo in lending, not only to the Developers but to ordinary folk that couldn’t not even afford the matchboxes the banks were lending out money for. So you end up with a taxpayer bill of €13 billion for Bank of Ireland plus the 3.5 billion we already paid out Bank of Ireland lending practices were on par or  even worse than Anglo Irish Bank as they tried to catch up with Anglo . With the worsening mortgage default situation heading our way and a possible bailing out of negative equity home owners a much bigger loss provision will have to be faced up to at Bank of Ireland and that is before we start on the derivates Losses .For my money we are now looking at the end game.

Bank of Ireland is only months away from been nationalized and to assume anything else is simple ignoring reality, there cooked and we the taxpayers are snookered!

Just two points in support of this assumption

(1)    Yesterday the Irish times seem to have now gone against the Government with that article from MORGAN KELLY up to now there were mostly cheerleaders for the Government in its actions with the banks and the whole NAMA set up, the Kelly article is a watershed and a parting of the waves and I believe the Irish times is “smelling change” of Government is in the air and want to be on the winning side.

(2)   Cowen and lenihan have lost the plot all together and we now have foreign” minders “taking up residence in the Department of Finance and also in Treasury Buildings (NAMA ) Our sovereignty in lost because of the actions of these traitors and the blame game is about to get started.

                God help us all

look at these videos

http://www.bloomberg.com/video/64352822/

http://www.bloomberg.com/video/64349432/

Hangover for Irish Banks

Central Bank of Ireland located on Dame Street...

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MONDAY’S jump in banking stocks was followed by a hangover yesterday as the country’s lenders pared most of the gains posted in the session.

Bank of Ireland fell 4pc to 69c after Standard & Poor’s (S&P) cut its outlook to “negative” from “stable” and warned that the lender faces “considerable challenges” restoring its credit profile as the Irish economy recovers slowly.

“Our view is that the Irish economy is likely to recover only quite slowly, with household finances remaining stretched, asset prices unlikely to start appreciating materially for a couple of years and credit demand remaining muted for many years,” S&P said in a gloomy forecast.

Allied Irish Banks, fresh from celebrating the sale of its stake in Bank Zachodni, tumbled 4.6pc to 75c as ING Group said the bank “is not out of the woods yet”, following the sale and is still “likely” to end up in majority state ownership.

Another stock feeling groggy yesterday was Norkom which tumbled 15.8pc to 80c, extending the previous session’s 24 decline following a profit warning.

CRH was another loser, slipping 1.9pc to €13.20 after the building materials company was downgraded to “neutral” from “outperform” at Credit Suisse by equity analyst Harry Goad. His target price is €14 per share.

The ISEQ ended the session down 20.44 points, or 0.7pc, to 2795.04 points. Elsewhere in Europe, stocks were little changed with the Stoxx Europe 600 Index close to a four-month high, as better-than-estimated US retail sales offset a selloff in utilities and a slump in German investor confidence.

Stocks initially rallied after a government report showed sales at US retailers climbed in August for a second consecutive month. Separate figures from the ZEW Centre for European Economic Research showed German investor confidence fell more than economists forecast to a 19-month low in September.

In the UK inflation unexpectedly exceeded the government’s 3pc limit for a sixth month in August; while a UK housing-market gauge fell more than economists expected in August to the lowest since May 2009, according to the Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors.

Electricity companies RWE and E.ON dropped after brokers downgraded Germany’s largest utilities. Philips lost 3.9pc after the world’s biggest lighting company set new financial targets for the next five years. Gamesa Corporacion Tecnologica paced advancing shares amid takeover speculation.

ARM Holdings retreated 4pc after the company said a number of executives sold shares in the UK designer of semiconductors that power Apple’s iPhone.

Ladbrokes dropped 1.2pc after Goldman Sachs downgraded its recommendation on the bookie to “sell” from “neutral.”

– Thomas Molloy

Irish Independent

 

Comment:

This comes as no surprise to me as I have pointed out in previous posts the two main banks are from any normal booking keeping standards, they are both bankrupt

They are engaged in hiding enormous losses behind dioubious financial instruments called derivates as they are not going to disclose these losses

I believe they are trying to drip feed the markets over the next 3-5 years if they can get the time from the government or they will try to pass them off to NAMA

There is some credence to this method as NAMA is the ideal vehicle to do so through the Toxic toilet that is Anglo Irish Bank

Stay away from Irish  bank shares as I expect the State will eventually end up owing a majority holding of Allied Irish Bank and possibly a 49% stake holding of Bank of Ireland at best!

Irish banks are still in denial

While all the focus has been on losses at Anglo Irish, the other Irish banks are in denial about the scale of State support needed. It is time to face the facts: the three viable banks need over €17 billion, writes PETER MATHEWS 

LAST WEEK, the scary reports of liabilities at Irish banks centred on the colossal Anglo Irish Bank loan losses, the scale of which I (and other analysts) had been only too aware of more than a year ago. The focus on Anglo Irish was understandable, as far as it went. But the banking sector crisis is not just about Anglo. The Government is missing the bigger picture entirely.

The Irish banking system is analogous to a household’s heating/plumbing system with inter-related boilers. The two big boilers are AIB and Bank of Ireland. There are other smaller boilers, including Anglo and Irish Nationwide, which got really badly damaged by using the wrong fuel and, as a result, they’re now broken beyond repair. The correct decision now is to “stop-cock” Anglo and Irish Nationwide out of the overall system, decommission them and wind them down, in an orderly way, over a period of five to seven years.

AIB and Bank of Ireland (BoI) are the economy’s two heavy duty “main boilers”. Both are now in highly unreliable condition, hissing and spluttering and stopping and starting unpredictably. Both need major refits and servicing. They are severely undercapitalised and poorly directed and managed. Yet both persist in pretending they’re in reasonable shape. They are not. And that’s absolutely the case for BoI, notwithstanding the insistent protests that it is okay because it has more or less raised the capital amount indicated as adequate last March.

But that was last March. And last March’s estimates for both AIB and BoI were not enough. BoI needs €6.5 billion, not €3.65 billion. And AIB needs €10 billion, not €7.4 billion.

The proof goes along the following lines. Gross loans in AIB listed for transfer to the National Asset Management Agency (Nama) totalled €24 billion. A (light) 40 per cent writedown on this figure amounts to €9.6 billion, which should be rounded at €10 billion. We note also that AIB will have to absorb large further losses on its mortgage loan book, its corporate loan book and its SME book and also on its personal lending portfolio. In addition, it may well have uncovered exposures on derivatives. For these reasons, and extensive relevant professional experience, I feel conscience bound to point out that AIB definitely needs recapitalisation now of not less than €10 billion. Furthermore, AIB should not be selling its stakes in Polish and US banks. They are the most profitable, cash-flowing parts of AIB. AIB is only doing this as a panic measure to try and plug its deepening capital shortfall.

Similarly, BoI needs a €6.5 billion recapitalisation. Why €6.5 billion? Because in BoI, the listed loans for transfer to Nama were €16 billion. Apply a 40 per cent write down. This amounts to €6.4 billion, which should be rounded to €6.5 billion. All comments applicable to AIB in the preceding paragraph apply also to BoI.

The Educational Building Society (EBS) also needs recapitalisation of €1 billion to cover its loan losses. Four months ago, the Oireachtas Joint Committee on Finance and the Public Service was advised that the three viable banks, AIB, BoI and EBS, needed immediate capital of €10 billion, €6.5 billion and €1 billion. That’s €17.5 billion in total. The question arises: should the State provide all of this on top of the €7 billion already invested in AIB and BoI in 2009? Clearly not. How much of this €17.5 billion should the State invest? Perhaps €11 billion, in appropriate proportions, into AIB, BoI and EBS.

All of this will result in temporary State nationalisation of these three banks. This leads to another question: where will the €6.5 billion balance come from? The State will be in majority control, at levels in excess of 85 per cent, and able to force existing bondholders in AIB, BoI and EBS to take writedowns on their holdings of bonds, while maybe offering them, say, a small debt-for-equity swap as a sweetener to soften the blow. After, say, five years, the banks will have regained reasonable annual-maintainable normal profit levels in the range €3.5 billion to €4 billion, putting the State in a good position to realise, by way of stock exchange or private sales, its investment of €18 billion in these three banks, plus a profit.

Temporary nationalisation of AIB and BoI will merely formalise the reality that, without 100 per cent State support, both are insolvent. Removal of the State guarantee on deposits at this point would lead to a run on the banks’ deposits. However, we see the banks continuing their delusory charade that they are financially sound and independent!

Realism and optimism are essential for recovery. But optimism must be based on reality. As a country we’re facing a stark reality. Protracted denial in the banking industry, the Government, official Ireland and the professions must stop. Unfortunately, the Fianna Fáil-led Government is responsible for the financial destruction of our economy. Regrettably, the Green Party has collaborated in this destruction. These are the facts. The true situation has been denied by the Government for far too long.

Finally, after two years, only in the last few days have the Minister for Finance, the Government and (some of) the banks been forced to admit the true scale of the destruction. What a waste. What a shame.

So let’s stop the stupid denial. Let’s acknowledge the scale of destruction in the Irish-owned banking sector, not just the Anglo Irish story. AIB and BoI have not been honest with us. Their loan losses are also a shock-and-awe story and they’re only being revealed, on the drip, in drawn-out chapters.

Let’s measure truthfully all the appalling financial damage. Let’s insist AIB and BoI are recapitalised at the truthful, honest, correct and much more robust levels (thereby resulting in temporary nationalisation and bondholder participation through bond writedowns) to enable them to make necessary, much larger, loan-loss provisions than they’ve done to date. Let’s reverse the nonsensical, unwieldy Nama project. This can be done speedily and simply. We’ve got to stop what has become a slow-motion Nama/banks bailout nightmare. Let’s roll up our sleeves and face the challenge. And let’s get on with the work of recovery

source http://www.irishtimes.com/newspaper/opinion/2010/0909/1224278513715.html?via=mr

Comment

This is an excelent articel by PETER MATHEWS 

Early August I posted  my disbelief at the figures the EU stress test results for Allied Irish and Bank of Ireland at the time I stated I thought the figures from the EU were false and were conveniently forgetting some serious hidden derivative losses these corrupt institutions’ were keeping off the book through some fancy  account gimmickry  

My figures were for allied Irish were 10 billion and bank of Ireland, I thought 7 billion or there about .So it is nice to see an independent analyst confirm these figures

Comming over the wires I see headlines say

“Ireland has fallen four places to 29th on the list of global competitiveness and its banking system is the least sound of the 139 countries surveyed, according to the World Economic Forum’s annual rankings.”

now what does that tell you ?

Cowen & Lenihan spin doesn’t wash with the markets

SAN FRANCISCO (MarketWatch)

Standard & Poor’s Ratings Services downgraded Ireland’s credit rating Tuesday on concern about the cost of bailing out the country’s ailing banks.
S&P lowered Ireland’s long-term sovereign credit rating to AA- from AA and kept its outlook on negative, suggesting the ratings agency could cut again.
The downgrade applies to other ratings that depend on Ireland’s sovereign credit rating, including senior unsecured debt ratings on government-guaranteed securities of Irish banks, S&P noted.
The Irish economy, like many around the globe, is struggling, but well-to-do visitors are returning to the Emerald Isle to take advantage of more attractive pricing for lodging and a chance to enjoy its storied golf links.
“The government’s support of the banking sector represents a substantial and increasing fiscal burden, which in our view will be slow to unwind,” Standard & Poor’s credit analyst Trevor Cullinan said.
The euro /quotes/comstock/21o!x:seurusd (EURUSD 1.2633, +0.0006, +0.0475%) recently traded at $1.2624. That’s lower than it was earlier Tuesday and down from $1.2684 late Monday.
Like several developed countries, Ireland bailed out some of its largest banks in the wake of the 2008 financial crisis. Anglo Irish Bank was nationalized.
The government recently got European Commission approval to inject another 10 billion euros into Anglo Irish Bank, on top of the 14.3 billion euros it already provided. That’s sparked concern Ireland may have to spend more on new support for other banks.
While such bailouts may have averted a much harsher global recession, they have left several developed countries burdened with more debt. Read about the sovereign debt crisis.
90 billion euros
The total cost of Ireland’s support for its banking sector may now reach 90 billion euros ($114 billion), or 58% of GDP, S&P estimated. That’s up from a previous forecast of 80 billion euros.

Comment:

The government’s lies to the markets is not working as we see by the latest Standard & Poor’s Ratings downgraded of Ireland’s credit rating this evening
Anyone that now still believes a single word out of Cowens or Lenihans mouths is guilty of plane stupidity
Surely the people who are backing these two clowns must now begin to question the sanity of their undying support for their pals in Anglo Irish Bank and the NAMA fraud that was set up to bail out the golden circle
These clowns must be stop before we are all totally ruined and condemned to go back to the depression of the 70,s or even the 50,s

Paddy McKillen V NAMA

Fast-tracking of Nama case sought
MARY CAROLAN

The National Assets Management Agency (Nama) and the State will ask the Commercial Court next Monday to fast-track the first legal challenge to the agency by businessman Paddy McKillen and 14 of his companies over the proposed transfer of Nama of €80 million loans of the companies.

Mr McKillen claims the €80 million credit facilities from Bank of Ireland are “fully performing”, not impaired, there is no default on repayments, and transfer of the loans would have a “drastic and significantly detrimental” impact on his business and property rights.
He has also expressed “grave concern” about the impact internationally of transfer of the loans to the “toxic bank”, the implications for his companies abilities to raise additional facilities and the valuations placed on the loans by Nama.

For instance, Nama had obtained a Stg£725.9 million valuation from CBRE for assets on which a loan for the UK Maybourne Hotel Group was secured when he had last month obtained a valuation of Stg 994.78 million from Cushman & Wakefield Hospitality

Ltd, he said. He was concerned such valuations would drive down the realisable value of his companies property portfolio.

Mr McKillen said his companies had not purchased any Irish assets since 1998 “and hence have not engaged in speculative development”. His companies instead invested in “world class retail centres and other quality assets”.
source http://www.irishtimes.com/newspaper/breaking/2010/0714/breaking56.html

This is just the bigining of a long legeal battel and I suspect the Taxpayers of this country will again fut the bills
everybody involved will walk away with fat pay cheques except the poor taxpayers of Ireland

New reserve currency

This is big trouble for the USA
WASHINGTON (AP) — Regulators on Friday shut down a Nevada bank, raising to 83 the number of U.S. bank failures this year.
The 83 closures so far this year is more than double the pace set in all of 2009, which was itself a brisk year for shutdowns. By this time last year, regulators had closed 40 banks. The pace has accelerated as banks’ losses mount on loans made for commercial property and development.

The Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. took over Nevada Security Bank, based in Reno, with $480.3 million in assets and $479.8 million in deposits. Umpqua Bank, based in Roseburg, Ore., agreed to assume the assets and deposits of the failed bank.
New reserve currency
We in Ireland are still bailing out bankrupt banks at the cost billions we don’t have causing economic depression for this and the next generation!
With 52 thousand students coming out of our universities and no jobs to go to
alone along with 100,000 people all ready left the country ,and another 53 thousand students leaving secondary education this year
How many of them are going into apprenticeships, jobs or is it emigration for the majority for them
The Unelected Cowen and his band of economic terrorists are helping the top bankers of the state live it up while the rest of us struggle to pay our monthly bills
I say let the bankrupt banks pay their own bills and allow them to fail, just like the Americans are doing in the land of Free markets
Allowing the crooks in the Dail to plunder our natural resources and the wealth of future generations is a crime I personally do not want to be responsible for, when our children ask what you did to prevent it I can show I was active in my opposition and I made a stand
What can you say you did??
It is the responsibility of each and every one of us to oppose this band of thieves we must stand up and take action
Do not just stand by and allow our country to be destroyed by the current government who have sold out to the faceless bondholders in Germany , France and England
Stand up and Fight back now!
Put yourself up for election do not give you vote to any of the current TD’s
We need new blood in the Dail and not Family dynasties
We want a general election now and we need a new community party made up of new local people from ordinary backgrounds that will work for an average wage and not clock up huge self given perks, ending up as millionaires while the rest of us struggle to pay for these perks & pensions
We need real servants of the people and not leach’s sucking the rest of us dry like some of the current shower of TD’s are doing
The next general election must end Gombeenisem for good.
Promise yourself this and we just might save Ireland!

Preliminary Report Into Ireland’s Banking Crisis 31 May 2010

After reading the Preliminary Report into Ireland’s Banking Crisis one can only come to the conclusion that Cowen and Lenihan are Guilty of “Gross Incompetence and Dereliction of Duty”
And should resign immediately and be brought before the courts
on charges of economic treason !

Preliminary Report Into Ireland’s Banking Crisis 31 May 2010

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