What is truth?

Archive for the ‘Bank für internationalen Zahlungsausgleich’ Category

New reserve currency

This is big trouble for the USA
WASHINGTON (AP) — Regulators on Friday shut down a Nevada bank, raising to 83 the number of U.S. bank failures this year.
The 83 closures so far this year is more than double the pace set in all of 2009, which was itself a brisk year for shutdowns. By this time last year, regulators had closed 40 banks. The pace has accelerated as banks’ losses mount on loans made for commercial property and development.

The Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. took over Nevada Security Bank, based in Reno, with $480.3 million in assets and $479.8 million in deposits. Umpqua Bank, based in Roseburg, Ore., agreed to assume the assets and deposits of the failed bank.
New reserve currency
We in Ireland are still bailing out bankrupt banks at the cost billions we don’t have causing economic depression for this and the next generation!
With 52 thousand students coming out of our universities and no jobs to go to
alone along with 100,000 people all ready left the country ,and another 53 thousand students leaving secondary education this year
How many of them are going into apprenticeships, jobs or is it emigration for the majority for them
The Unelected Cowen and his band of economic terrorists are helping the top bankers of the state live it up while the rest of us struggle to pay our monthly bills
I say let the bankrupt banks pay their own bills and allow them to fail, just like the Americans are doing in the land of Free markets
Allowing the crooks in the Dail to plunder our natural resources and the wealth of future generations is a crime I personally do not want to be responsible for, when our children ask what you did to prevent it I can show I was active in my opposition and I made a stand
What can you say you did??
It is the responsibility of each and every one of us to oppose this band of thieves we must stand up and take action
Do not just stand by and allow our country to be destroyed by the current government who have sold out to the faceless bondholders in Germany , France and England
Stand up and Fight back now!
Put yourself up for election do not give you vote to any of the current TD’s
We need new blood in the Dail and not Family dynasties
We want a general election now and we need a new community party made up of new local people from ordinary backgrounds that will work for an average wage and not clock up huge self given perks, ending up as millionaires while the rest of us struggle to pay for these perks & pensions
We need real servants of the people and not leach’s sucking the rest of us dry like some of the current shower of TD’s are doing
The next general election must end Gombeenisem for good.
Promise yourself this and we just might save Ireland!

Debt Burden Falls Heavily on Germany and France

By JACK EWING

FRANKFURT — French and German banks have lent nearly $1 trillion to the most troubled European countries and are more exposed to the debt crisis than the banks of any other countries, according to a new report that is likely to add pressure on institutions to detail their holdings.

Enlarge This Image


Ronald Zak/Associated Press

Jean-Claude Trichet, left, president of the European Central Bank, with Josef Ackermann of Deutsche Bank.

French banks had lent $493 billion to Spain, Greece, Portugal and Ireland by the end of 2009 while German banks had lent $465 billion, according to the report by the Bank for International Settlements, an institution based in Basel, Switzerland, that acts as a clearing house for the world’s central banks.

The report sheds light on where the risks from Spain and other troubled euro-zone countries are concentrated, but left open the question of which individual banks would be most endangered by declines in the prices of sovereign bonds or a surge in bad loans made to companies and individuals. The B.I.S. did not identify individual institutions, in line with its confidentiality rules.

Voluntary disclosure by banks has been uneven. Hypo Real Estate Holding, a real estate and public-sector lender based near Munich, has put its exposure to government debt from the four countries plus Italy at more than €80 billion, or $97 billion. Deutsche Bank, in Frankfurt, says it holds €500 million in Greek government bonds and no Spanish or Portuguese sovereign debt.

But there has been little disclosure from the hundreds of smaller mortgage lenders, state-owned banks and savings banks that dominate banking in countries like Germany and Spain.

“More information and disclosure on bank and financial institutions’ holdings of periphery paper would be beneficial,” Jacques Cailloux, an economist at Royal Bank of Scotland, said Sunday. Mr. Cailloux had not seen the report — which was released to news organizations on the condition that they not publish the findings until late Sunday — but he was one of the authors of a Royal Bank of Scotland study in May that anticipated many of the B.I.S. findings.

All told, Spain, Ireland, Portugal and Greece owe nearly $1.6 trillion to banks in the 16-country euro zone, either in the form of government debt or credit to companies and individuals in the four countries, the report said. Credit from French and German banks accounted for 61 percent of that total.

Uncertainty about which banks may be at risk from Greece and the other countries has fed mistrust among financial institutions, causing interbank lending to wither and leading European Union leaders to take extraordinary steps to prevent a financial collapse.

The European Central Bank has been pressuring E.U. regulators to release data on which banks may be most at risk, to separate the healthy banks from those that may be in trouble.

“We are encouraging them to do whatever is necessary to improve the sentiment of the market because that is the real issue today,” the E.C.B. president, Jean-Claude Trichet, said at a news conference last week.

Mr. Cailloux said that releasing the results of so-called stress tests, which examine banks’ ability to withstand market shocks, would be useful if the tests were based on realistic possibilities and there were measures in place to bolster the banks that prove vulnerable.

The lack of information about which banks could suffer most from Europe’s debt crisis led to the near-seizure of money markets in early May. That, along with plunging prices for sovereign bonds from the weakest countries, prompted the European Union and the International Monetary Fund to pledge nearly $1 trillion in debt guarantees for euro-zone governments.

The European Central Bank also took the unprecedented step of buying European government bonds in the open markets, where trading had nearly come to a halt.

“There is mounting evidence that the blind don’t want to lend to the blind,” Ed Yardeni, president of Yardeni Research, wrote in a research note last week.

The B.I.S. figures confirm estimates of the level of risk by analysts at Royal Bank of Scotland and others, which had been extrapolated from B.I.S. data and other sources. But the B.I.S. report provides more detail on country-by-country exposure, and the organization’s imprimatur means it will be difficult for critics to dismiss the information as exaggerated.

Most of the claims held by the French and German banks were from companies, individuals or other banks, and Spain was the biggest debtor country. But much of the holdings were government debt — $106 billion for French banks and $68 billion for German banks. The figures, which the B.I.S. presented in dollars, may offer a clue why the French government, in particular, has been keen to provide aid to Greece and the other troubled countries.

Private-sector debt from Spain, Greece, Portugal and Ireland has also become a concern, because government austerity programs and economic downturns in those countries may also take a toll on the ability of companies and individuals to repay loans, and lead to a surge in defaults.

The risk from the so-called peripheral countries is by no means limited to France and Germany. British banks have lent $230 billion to Ireland, while Spain — besides being one of the countries with a debt problem — has lent $110 billion to residents of Portugal.

The B.I.S. put total exposure by U.S. institutions to Spain, Greece, Portugal and Ireland at less than $200 billion.

source http://www.nytimes.com/2010/06/14/business/global/14eurobank.html?ref=jack_ewing

MaxKeiser report 42

Max gives his take on the Europeans 960,000.000.000$ bail out
Great stuff

Krise bedroht deutsche Staatsbanken

Griechen-Krise bedroht deutsche Staatsbanken

Von Anne Seith, Frankfurt am Main


 

HRE-Zentrale: Die Krisenbank gehört zu den großen Gläubigern Griechenlands

Die Idee klingt so einfach wie verlockend: Weil Banken mit griechischen Anleihen gezockt haben, sollen sie sich an der Rettung des Pleitelands beteiligen, verlangen viele Politiker. Eine Milchmädchenrechnung – denn betroffen wären vor allem Institute, die ganz oder teilweise dem Staat gehören.

Es ist mittlerweile ein natürlicher Reflex: Wenn es um die finanziellen Folgen der Finanzkrise geht, rufen Politiker nach der Beteiligung der Finanzbranche. So auch in Sachen Griechenland: Da ist mittlerweile manch ein Volksvertreter der Meinung, der Krisenstaat könne nur noch via Umschuldung gerettet werden. Das würde bedeuten: Griechenland einigt sich mit seinen Gläubigern darauf, nur einen Teil der Kredite zurückzuzahlen.

Eine Umschuldung fordert auch der CSU-Finanzexperte Hans Michelbach, der großspurig eine internationale Gläubigerkonferenz einberufen möchte. Und in diesem Zusammenhang natürlich auch erwähnt, dass die Finanzbranche bei der Rettung des hellenischen Schuldenstaats ihren Beitrag leisten müsse. Auch der nordrhein-westfälische CDU-Ministerpräsident Jürgen Rüttgers findet, es müsse genau geschaut werden, “wer die Zeche bezahlt”. Er will die Banken ebenfalls für Griechenland zur Kasse bitten. Ein Wunsch, den trotz der anstehenden Landtagswahl selbst SPD-Chef Frank-Walter Steinmeier unterstützt.

Die Botschaft der Politiker ist klar: Diejenigen, die sich mit griechischen Staatsanleihen verzockt haben, sollen nun auch die Kosten tragen.

Doch dem wohlklingenden Appell liegt zumindest teilweise eine Milchmädchenrechnung zugrunde. Denn in Deutschland haben nach jetzigem Kenntnisstand ausgerechnet die Banken viele Griechenland-Papiere in ihren Büchern, die dem Staat ganz oder teilweise gehören: Die Hypo Real Estate (HRE) und die Commerzbank.

Die HRE – die mittlerweile Deutsche Pfandbriefbank heißt und mit rund 100 Milliarden Euro gestützt wird – kam zum 31.12.2009 auf ein Volumen von 7,9 Milliarden Euro an griechischen Staatsbonds. Bei der Commerzbank sind es etwa drei Milliarden. Auch einige Landesbanken sind betroffen. Bei der BayernLB etwa sprechen Finanzkreise von einem Engagement in Höhe von 300 Millionen Euro.

“Euphemistische Beschreibung eines Bankrotts”

Bankenprofessor Hans-Peter Burghof warnt deshalb: Wenn etwa die HRE oder die Commerzbank große Summen abschreiben müssen, geraten sie in neue Finanzprobleme. “Dann kommt man um eine Kapitalerhöhung nicht herum. Und da die Banken dem Staat gehören, muss der das bezahlen.” Sprich: Die Verluste aus den Griechenland-Geschäften würden sozialisiert, so oder so. Bei der HRE würden, je nach Wertberichtigungsbedarf, womöglich sogar neue Hilfen in Milliardenhöhe fällig, warnt Konrad Becker, Analyst von Merck Finck. Es könnte für die Regierung “billiger sein, Griechenland direkt zu helfen.”

Auch sonst ist das Risiko einer Umschuldung – die Bankenprofessor Burghof als “euphemistische Beschreibung eines Staatsbankrotts” charakterisiert – schwer zu kalkulieren. Viele deutsche Geldinstitute geben sich reichlich verschlossen, was ihr genaues Engagement in Griechenland betrifft. Bei der Landesbank Baden-Württemberg will man sich zu einzelnen Posten des Portfolios generell nicht äußern, bei der Hessischen Landesbank spricht man von einem “äußerst geringen” Betrag im mittleren zweistelligen Millionenbereich.

Und die Zahlen, die man bekommt, stimmen nicht unbedingt optimistisch. Insgesamt, so heißt es bei der Bank für internationalen Zahlungsausgleich, schuldet Griechenland deutschen Geldinstituten rund 43 Milliarden Euro. Die Allianz erklärt, die gesamte Gruppe habe mit Stichtag 31. Dezember etwa 3,5 Milliarden Euro an griechischen Staatsanleihen in den Büchern. Bei der Münchner Rück waren es Ende 2009 rund 2,2 Milliarden Euro.

Märkte rechnen mit Umschuldung

Wie viel von diesen Summen nun unter Umständen tatsächlich bedroht ist, weiß niemand. Die EU-Kommission ist sogar noch immer davon überzeugt, dass eine Umschuldung erst gar nicht nötig sein wird. Das Spar- und Reformprogramm, das die EU Anfang Mai vorlegen will, werde die grassierende Unsicherheit beenden, sagte der Generaldirektor für Wirtschaft und Finanzen, Marco Buti. Und er versucht zu beruhigen: “Um es sehr klar zu sagen – es wird keine Schulden-Restrukturierung als Teil des Programms geben.”

Die Veröffentlichung des “sehr, sehr ernsthaften” und glaubwürdigen Programms werde an den Finanzmärkten Vertrauen schaffen und die Zinsaufschläge bei griechischen Staatsanleihen reduzieren, ist Buti überzeugt. Das Programm werde über einen Zeitraum von drei Jahren Einsparungen und tiefgreifende Strukturreformen vorsehen.

Bankenprofessor Burghof allerdings findet, eine Umschuldung wäre trotz aller Risiken “ehrlicher”. Dort wo das Risiko eingegangen wurde, würde es auch abgeschrieben: in den Büchern der Banken.

Auch an den Märkten gehen die Anleger inzwischen davon aus, dass Griechenland seine Kredite nicht ganz wird zurückzahlen können. Finanzwerte sackten am Dienstag weltweit in den Keller. Zur Verunsicherung trugen noch die Aussagen deutscher Regierungspolitiker bei, die Zweifel am vereinbarten Hilfspaket aufkommen ließen. “Das ist ein sehr gefährliches Spiel, das hier gespielt wird. Eigentlich preist der Markt inzwischen schon einen Ausfall Griechenlands ein – zumindest teilweise”, sagte LBBW-Volkswirt Jens-Oliver Niklasch. “Da spielt auch die Bundesregierung mit ihrer Taktiererei mit dem Feuer. Die Märkte warten ja nur auf das grüne Licht aus Berlin.”

Deutsche Bank: Wir haben mit Griechenland nichts zu tun

Zu den stärksten Verlierern im Dax gehörte absurderweise die Deutsche Bank. Die Aktien von Deutschlands größtem Geldhaus verloren zeitweise um fast fünf Prozent an Wert – dabei hatte der Konzern am Dienstag glänzende Quartalszahlen vorgelegt. Doch die Börsianer störten sich nicht nur an einem ausgesprochen zurückhaltenden Ausblick von Finanzchef Stefan Krause – auch die Belastung durch die Übernahme von Sal. Oppenheim sorgt die Finanzexperten.

Denn durch die erstmalige Einbeziehung der Kölner Privatbank schmolz die Kernkapitalquote von Dezember bis Ende März von 12,6 auf 11,2 Prozent. Damit liege die Deutsche Bank am unteren Ende im Vergleich zu ihren Wettbewerbern, kritisierte Unicredit-Analyst Stefan Stalmann. Börsianer machen sich daher Sorgen, ob die Bank nicht doch mehr Kapital braucht.

Immerhin: In der Debatte um eine mögliche Griechenland-Pleite kann sich Deutsche-Bank-Chef Josef Ackermann, der sonst oft als Vorzeige-Buhmann der Bankenbranche herhalten muss, entspannt zurücklehnen. Sein Haus hat nach eigenen Aussagen mit der ganzen Sache wenig zu tun.

Natürlich sagen auch die Deutsch-Banker nicht genau, was in ihren Büchern an griechischen Anleihen steht. Aber auf Nachfrage in einem Analysten-Call konnte Finanzchef Stefan Krause zwei beruhigende Nachrichten in die Welt setzen. “Very limited”, sehr begrenzt, sei das Engagement des Hauses in Griechenland. “Wir sind nicht beunruhigt.”

Tag Cloud